Saturday, 31 October 2015

THE LAST WITCH HUNTER

The last witch hunter is all that stands between humanity and the combined forces of the most horrifying witches in history —IMDB

Pretty bad. The CGI effects and cinematography are pretty stunning but the story is shallow and the characters are made of cardboard. Vin Diesel is his usual wooden self. The horror is  moderate and so over the top that it doesn’t create much suspense. Give it a miss unless you really just want to see some cool effects while being bored silly.


Friday, 30 October 2015

NEW RELEASE DVD RECOMMENDATION - AMY

SUMMARY: The story of Amy Winehouse in her own words, featuring unseen archival footage and unheard tracks. — IMDB

MY REVIEW: I wasn't aware of Amy Winehouse until her death hit the news media in 2011. But I decided to go and see this documentary because it was receiving accolades from critics. I'm glad I did (although "glad" is not quite the right word). Amy Winehouse could have been one of the great jazz/soul singer/songwriters the world had known. In her short 27 years of life, she rocketed to fame and fortune at a speed that overwhelmed her.  She died of alcohol poisoning on 23 July 2011. AMY unveils her life with photos, videos, music, and interviews in a powerful and moving journey. The story is incredibly tragic. While the documentary makes no judgements of Amy, it is clear that her desperate need for love and human connection were never fulfilled and, combined with intrusive scrutiny from the media, addiction to drugs and alcohol, and the mocking denigration of the public as she fell from grace, all conspired to lead her down the path to her unnecessary death. Even if you are not a fan of Amy's music, this documentary is powerfully compelling. My only criticism is that it is a little too long. But that is a minor criticism for what is a brilliant film.


Wednesday, 28 October 2015

YOUR GUIDE TO THIS WEEK'S NEW CINEMA RELEASES

Ready to head to the cinema to see a new movie? Here they are …

TOP PICK TO SEE


Top pick this week is a comedy called MISTRESS AMERICA in which a lonely college freshman's life is turned upside down by her impetuous, adventurous soon-to-be stepsister. I’ve heard an interview with Greta Gerwig who co-wrote and stars in the movie. It sounds like good fun. Empire’s Ian Freer refers to her when he describes the movie as, … Sharp, fast and witty [—] it's old school screwball comedy with a cool modern twist. And Greta Gerwig is a bona fide genius. I’m looking forward to seeing this one.

OTHERS TO SEE


Good comedies are usually hard to find. So it is unusual that there are two to see this week — the top pick being one of them. The other one is SLEEPING WITH OTHER PEOPLE. In this one, a good-natured womaniser and a serial cheater form a platonic relationship that helps reform them in ways, while a mutual attraction sets in. Don’t expect it to be perfect, though. The Hollywood Reporter’s Leslie Felperin says, Sleeping With Other People is a brittle, bawdy, frequently funny romcom that might be too smart for its own good. We’ll have to check it out and see.

MAYBE/MAYBE NOT


Two movies in the maybe/maybe not category for you this week. First is THE DRESSMAKER which tells the story of a glamorous woman who returns to her small town in rural Australia. With her sewing machine and haute couture style, she transforms the women and exacts sweet revenge on those who did her wrong. I’ve already reviewed this one. In my opinion, the trailers for THE DRESSMAKER somewhat misrepresent the movie. It comes across as a period drama with a touch of humour. However, this movie is black comedy through and through. It was quirky, over-the-top, and funny. The cinematography is great and the acting pretty good with Kate Winslet (Myrtle ‘Tilly’ Dunnage) putting in a good performance. Sarah Snook (Gertrude ‘Trudy’ Pratt) is good as usual and Judy Davis (Molly Dunnage) is hilarious. It’s a good yarn and the reveal of what really happened in Tilly’s childhood is a satisfying surprise. It’s a fun movie but not brilliant — just ok. ***

Finally, there is THE LAST WITCH HUNTER. Played by Vin Diesel, the last witch hunter is all that stands between humanity and the combined forces of the most horrifying witches in history. General public are rating it as average while most critics don’t like it at all. According to Screen International’s Wendy Ide, Like its star, The Last Witch Hunter is big, overblown and frequently incomprehensible. I didn’t expect much more from this after seeing the trailer. It’s low on my list, but if I see it I’ll let you know what it’s like. Also, let us know if you see it and what you think.

That's it for this week. See you at the movies!

*NOTE* Movie summaries are adaptations of movie summary on IMDB. Opinions are mine unless credited. These updates are written from an Australian perspective so openings of the movies in cinemas may vary in other parts of the world.

Tuesday, 27 October 2015

THE LOBSTER

In a dystopian near future, single people, according to the laws of The City, are taken to The Hotel, where they are obliged to find a romantic partner in forty-five days or are transformed into beasts and sent off into The Woods. --IMDB

One of the most bizarre movies I've seen -- but very intriguing. But what is it trying to say? That's a good question. When I heard the director being interviewed, he said he didn't really have a particular agenda. In my view, the first half of the movie is about the privileging of the nuclear family in society; the second half is about the lengths we will go to, as humans, not to be alone. THE LOBSTER is a very quirky movie. The actors do an excellent job of conveying the oppressive societies they live in. Some of the humour is pretty black. And there are some moving moments. This movie will definitely not be for everyone. It takes some time after the movie before you'll develop some ideas about what it is about - and even then, you won't be sure if you've got it right! If you're looking for something off the beaten track, can handle ambiguity, and enjoy being intellectually provoked, give it a go.



Sunday, 25 October 2015

BURNT

Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) is a Chef who destroyed his career with drugs and diva behavior. He cleans up and returns to London, determined to redeem himself by spearheading a top restaurant that can gain three Michelin stars. —IMDB

BURNT is mostly pretty bland except when Bradley Cooper is losing his temper. The scenes between him and Sienna Miller are the best in the movie. And I can only assume that the scenes in the kitchen are what really happens in top restaurant kitchens. But one can only sustain interest in images of good looking food for so long — stories about cooks and chefs need to have a lot more depth than this. BURNT has a reasonable message but the ending is predictable. It’s a lazy movie that is probably ok for a Sunday afternoon at home when it’s raining — and you have a nice place of food in front of you. Save this one for DVD.


COMING SOON — THE DRESSMAKER

A glamorous woman returns to her small town in rural Australia. With her sewing machine and haute couture style, she transforms the women and exacts sweet revenge on those who did her wrong. —IMDB

In my opinion, the trailers for THE DRESSMAKER somewhat misrepresent the movie. It comes across as a period drama with a touch of humour. However, this movie is black comedy through and through. It was quirky, over-the-top, and funny. The cinematography is great and the acting pretty good with Kate Winslet (Myrtle ‘Tilly’ Dunnage) putting in a good performance. Sarah Snook (Gertrude ‘Trudy’ Pratt) is good as usual and Judy Davis (Molly Dunnage) is hilarious. It’s a good yarn and the reveal of what really happened in Tilly’s childhood is a satisfying surprise. It’s a fun movie but not brilliant — just ok. THE DRESSMAKER opens on October 29.


BRIDGE OF SPIES

An American lawyer is recruited by the CIA during the Cold War to help rescue a pilot detained in the Soviet Union. — IMDB

When you team up the Cohen brothers as writers with the masterful storyteller and director Steven Spielberg, you expect to get something special. And BRIDGE OF SPIES is just that — something special. It’s the true story of James B Donovan (Tom Hanks), a lawyer with no criminal trial experience, who is asked  by the US government to defend a Russian spy, Rudolf Abel (played by Mark Rylance). It’s a great story of a great man who served his country with integrity, despite the personal costs to himself. It’s gratifying to see a true hero on screen in contrast to all the fantasy heroes we are used to seeing of late. The pace of the movie is subdued, but it is engaging and finishes with us on the edge of our seats. The cinematography is excellent and portrays the Cold War period well along with the story that breathes new life into this genre. Hanks is excellent in the starring role and all supporting cast are good. A solid spy drama that tells an important story. Go see it!


Friday, 23 October 2015

BLINKY BILL THE MOVIE

An adventurous young koala embarks on a journey across the wild and dangerous Australian outback in the hope of finding his missing father, but he soon discovers that there is more to being a hero than meets the eye. — IMDB

BLINKY BILL THE MOVIE is a delightful story that preserves the beautiful simplicity of older animations  but is right up to date in terms of its glossiness. The colour palette is gorgeous and the animals are highly detailed — right down to their fur and feathers. The humour is very Australian — but would still work for international audiences. The story is well paced, full of quirky characters, foot-tapping music, and lots of action. The voices are provided by the likes of Toni Colette and David Denham. Great fun — take your kids to see it! It’s a very family friendly movie.


LEGEND

The film tells the story of the identical twin gangsters Reggie and Ronnie Kray, two of the most notorious criminals in British history, and their organised crime empire in the East End of London during the 1960s. — IMDB

The best thing about this movie is Tom Hardy playing the two brothers, Reggie and Ronnie. It's a standout performance. It’s a true story but delivered superficially — which is a shame because it looks like an interesting piece of history. There’s lots of violence and humour so it’s hard to take the story too seriously.


YOUR GUIDE TO THIS WEEK'S NEW CINEMA RELEASES

One must see movie to check out this week ...

TOP PICK TO SEE


Tom Hanks stars in my top pick to see this week -- it will be good to see him in a movie again. And it's directed by Steven Spielberg, which bodes well. It is BRIDGE OF SPIES and is the true story of an American lawyer (Tom Hanks) who is recruited by the CIA during the Cold War to help rescue a pilot detained in the Soviet Union. It's getting high scores so make sure you catch it. Time Out New York's Joshua Rothkopf says that, 'Gifts of civility small and large mark Steven Spielberg's latest film, a deeply satisfying Cold War spy thriller that feels more subdued than usual for the director-even more so than 2012's philosophical Lincoln-but one that shapes up expertly into a John Le CarrĂ©-style nail-biter.' It’s a great movie — saw it today. My review coming soon.

OTHERS TO SEE


I was listening to a review on the radio of the movie THE LOBSTER and it was described as Greek Weird genre. Not sure what that means but I notice that the movie is in French and English! LOBSTER is a comedy romance sci-fi set in a dystopian near future where single people, according to the laws of The City, are taken to The Hotel, where they are obliged to find a romantic partner in forty-five days or are transformed into beasts and sent off into The Woods. The Telegraph’s Robbie Collin says that ‘Every frame has been composed with cerebral coolness, and the hotel and its surrounding forests are shot with a dream-like lucidity. I haven't seen anything quite like it before, and I'm still not sure that I have even now. This is the kind of film you have to go back to and check it really happened.’ Sounds intriguing.

MAYBE/MAYBE NOT


ALEX & EVE is a comedy about Alex, a Greek Orthodox schoolteacher, who falls for Lebanese Muslim lawyer, Eve. The relationship is forbidden by both families, and thus the emotional dilemma of 'Alex and Eve' is created. That’s all I know about this one and it is only in limited release. If I catch up with it, I’ll post my review for you.

Bradley Cooper turns to cooking in BURNT where he plays Adam Jones, a Chef who destroyed his career with drugs and diva behaviour. He cleans up and returns to London, determined to redeem himself by spearheading a top restaurant that can gain three Michelin stars. The general public are rating this one quite high, but critics are not so impressed. TheWrap’s Alonso Duralde says that, ‘Burnt ultimately feels like those sous-vide bags that Adam finds so worthy of mockery: trapped in plastic, with the air sucked out of it.’ You’ll have to decide whether you go with the general viewer or the critics.

TO AVOID


One to avoid this week, PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE GHOST DIMENSION. In this interminable series, this episode is about a family who must protect their daughter from an evil entity with a sinister plan using a special camera that can see spirits. The Wrap’s Alonso Duralde says it ‘… feels like the last wheeze of a played-out series. When the time on your watch becomes more compelling than the timestamp on the movie’s video footage, it’s time to pack it in. Forget this one and use your time to see a good movie!

That's it for this week. See you at the movies!

*NOTE* Movie summaries are adaptations of movie summary on IMDB. Opinions are mine unless credited. These updates are written from an Australian perspective so openings of the movies in cinemas may vary in other parts of the world.

Monday, 19 October 2015

unINDIAN

Meera, a beautiful Australian women of Indian origin, living in Sydney. Divorced and a single mother, she follows her dreams, instead of that of her parents'. Falling in love with a Australian man Will, for Meera is not only scandalous, it's UNindian. (Written by Thushy Sathiamoorthy, IMDB)


UNINDIAN is cliched and predictable. There is some value in the way that the viewer is educated about cultural issues and how children of Indian parents face challenges in living in two worlds - and for white Australians entering it. The acting was ok, but seemed stilted and forced at times. This is, of course, Brett Lee's first foray into acting. Fortunately, he is working with some experienced Indian actors. The whole thing felt like an amateur production (maybe shackled by a limited budget). Tannishtha Chatterjee (Anna Karenina) was good and her young sister, Smitha, played by first time child actor Maya Sathi, was delightful.The matriarch of the family was great too. So, overall, not a great movie although some of the characters are fun and the last act ramped up the tension a bit. Wait for the DVD.

 

Sunday, 18 October 2015

MISS YOU ALREADY

The friendship between two life-long girlfriends is put to the test when one starts a family and the other falls ill. — IMDB

This movie was shamelessly cliched. It is dealing with some very significant issues — breast cancer, death and dying, friendship — and I have had personal experience with all of these. Much of the story is unbelievable and feels inauthentic. There is no real depth of friendship or chemistry between the main characters. And the hospice that Milly (Toni Colette) spends time in looks like a very expensive hotel room where we never see any staff caring for her! Toni Colette is frequently over-the-top and, in fact, is accused by her friend Jess (Drew Barrymore) at one point of being a cancer bully. I’m sure there are people for whom the term would be apt. But in this case the character of Milly seemed to be a caricature. I never felt much empathy with the characters — not good in a movie with these themes. The whole thing seemed forced, overwrought and manipulative so it didn’t work for me. A shame given the usually talented cast.


THE WALK

In 1974, high-wire artist Philippe Petit (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) recruits a team of people to help him realize his dream: to walk the immense void between the World Trade Center towers. — IMDB

There’s nothing worth watching in this movie until the last act when Philippe Petit and his co-conspirators actually arrive at the top of the Twin Towers and he steps out onto the wire. The preparation at the top is relatively suspenseful and the wire walk is mesmerising and tense. The 3D is used brilliantly to accentuate the height of the walk and I had a knot in my stomach while it was happening even though I knew it was acting!

The rest of the movie, up until the last act, is very boring, overacted, with almost no dramatic tension. And worse than all of this, is the incredibly irritating narration! From the opening shots, Philippe is standing on the top of the Statue of Liberty, telling us just about everything that is happening while we see it happening on screen. Doesn’t the director think we can work out what we are seeing?!

If you feel that watching one-third of a movie in 3D is worth the money, then go see it. Otherwise give it a miss or wait for the DVD.


Friday, 16 October 2015

CRIMSON PEAK

In the aftermath of a family tragedy, an aspiring author is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious outsider. Trying to escape the ghosts of her past, she is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds...and remembers. — IMDB

Nowhere near as scary as I thought it would be. It’s more a romantic period drama with a ghost in it than a ghost story that has a romance in it. The horror is actually quite mild (for me, at least!) and the story is bigger and more dominant than the moments of horror. I enjoyed the movie. It is visually sumptuous and striking. Mia Wasikowska, Jessica Chastain and Tom Hiddleston are all excellent as the main protagonists. The story is pretty cliched and predictable, but moves along at a reasonable pace. What makes CRIMSON PEAK particularly enjoyable is the creepy atmosphere of the house in which the majority of the story takes place. The special effects are pretty good and it is directed well. And the cast are riveting. If you like an old-style gothic ghost story with beautiful visuals, an undemanding narrative, lovely costumes, and some melodrama, check it out.


YOUR GUIDE TO THIS WEEK'S NEW CINEMA RELEASES

Four new movies and the cinema for your viewing pleasure this week…

TOP PICK TO SEE


Two movies are vying for top pick to see this week — CRIMSON PEAK and THE WALK. Because THE WALK probably has broader appeal, I’m putting that one at the top. THE WALK is a true story that takes place in 1974. High-wire artist Philippe Petit recruits a team of people to help him realise his dream: to walk the immense void between the World Trade Center towers. It’s available in 3D and, given the location, I think I’d go with that option. While the movie is not necessarily brilliant, The Hollywood Reporter’s David Rooney describes it as Harnessing the wizardry of 3-D IMAX to magnify the sheer transporting wonder… [With T]he you-are-there thrill of the experience, the film's payoff more than compensates for a lumbering setup, laden with cloying voiceover narration and strained whimsy. My review coming soon.

OTHERS TO SEE


Second on my top list is the drama fantasy horror CRIMSON PEAK. In the aftermath of a family tragedy, an aspiring author (Mia Wasikowska) is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious outsider. Trying to escape the ghosts of her past, she is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds...and remembers. From the shorts I’ve seen, I would say this is a period drama with some gothic elements taking place in a big, rundown house. The A.V. Club’s Katie Rife is unsurprised, given it is a Del Toro film, that … the production design is the real star of Crimson Peak. The trailers certainly look visually stunning. My review coming soon.

MAYBE/MAYBE NOT


A couple of films on the maybe/maybe not list this week. First is UNINDIAN. Beautiful divorcee and single mother of one, Meera (Tannishtha Chatterjee) is an Australian of Indian origin. Smart and independent, she has carved out a successful life for herself and her daughter ... despite family pressure to find 'a nice Indian match'. Then Meera meets Will (Brett Lee)... tall and blonde with a charming smile. But falling in love with an Australian man is not only scandalous - it's unindian! Does she do as her family wishes? ... Or does she follow her heart and live her life the way she wants? Highlighting the complexities of wooing another from a different culture, unINDIAN is a comedy with a lot of heart and a little spice! No word from the critics yet, so not sure what this will be like. General viewers are rating a bit above average.

Finally, LEGEND tells the story of the identical twin gangsters Reggie and Ronnie Kray, two of the most notorious criminals in British history, and their organised crime empire in the East End of London during the 1960s. It looks very violent from the trailers I’ve seen. Critics don’t like this one much. For example, The Hollywood Reporter’s Leslie Felperin describes it this way: This ungainly portrait strikes a lot of poses, as if inviting the viewer to admire its impressive cast list, fine period detailing, "cheeky" British humor, and insouciant attitude towards violence. But none of it disguises the fact that the film is also tonally incoherent, vacuous and structurally a bleedin' mess.

That's it for this week. See you at the movies!

*NOTE* Movie summaries are adaptations of movie summary on IMDB. Opinions are mine unless credited. These updates are written from an Australian perspective so openings of the movies in cinemas may vary in other parts of the world.

Monday, 12 October 2015

LEARNING TO DRIVE

As her marriage dissolves, a Manhattan writer takes driving lessons from a Sikh instructor with marriage troubles of his own. In each other's company they find the courage to get back on the road and the strength to take the wheel. — IMDB

LEARNING TO DRIVE had lots of potential, but it turns out to be a rather monotonous, bland attempt at a romantic comedy drama. Ben Kingsley, who plays the nighttime taxi driver and daytime driving instructor, Darwan, is Ben Kingsley through-and-through who comes across as stiff and not always authentic. Patricia Clarkson (Wendy) shows some emotional range but at times, she wasn’t convincing, particularly when she was trying to cry. The most interesting character in the story is Jasleen (played by Sarita Choudhury, who played the arranged marriage wife of Darwan) whose character and story are not really developed. There is some ok life lessons delivered by Darwan during his driving instruction of Wendy, and the relationship they develop has some interesting elements. But LEARNING TO DRIVE wanders along at a walking pace with little narrative drive. Slightly amusing and good for viewers who just want a light piece of entertainment.


LONDON ROAD

London Road documents the events of 2006, when the quiet rural town of Ipswich was shattered by the discovery of the bodies of five women. The residents of London Road had struggled for years with frequent soliciting and kerb-crawling on their street. When a local resident was charged and then convicted of the murders, the community grappled with what it meant to be at the epicentre of this tragedy. — Protagonist Pictures

LONDON ROAD is a strange movie in that it is a musical about a horrific series of murders — five women prostitutes by a resident of London Road in Ipswich. It’s a version of the musical stage play and uses the exact words of the protagonists during interviews following the murder and the subsequent investigation. I’m not a fan of musicals, but this one sort of works. There are some compelling, and even disturbing, moments. But, overall, I felt that singing natural language was contrived and detracted from the seriousness of the circumstances. The movie focuses entirely on the responses of the members of the community to the crime that has occurred right in their street. And their attitudes to the victims of the crime are important to contemplate. I acknowledge that this musical is innovative. But that isn’t enough for me to conclude that this is a great movie. At one point, I looked up the movie length and was glad to see it was only 91 minutes long. I see that general audiences are rating this movie just under average. In this case, movie critics seem to be more appreciative of this one than the rest of the population. I wouldn’t want to sit through it again.


Sunday, 11 October 2015

BLACK MASS

The true story of Whitey Bulger, the brother of a state senator and the most infamous violent criminal in the history of South Boston, who became an FBI informant to take down a Mafia family invading his turf. —IMDB

Johnny Depp as Bulger is riveting in this true crime drama, and Joel Edgerton who plays the FBI agent for whom Bulger becomes and informant, is strong in the supporting role. The movie is extremely violent — sometimes bordering on the unnecessary — and the script is complex requiring considerable concentration. The problem I have with this movie is that we never really know what the inner life of Bulger was. The psychological dynamics of this criminal are never articulated. Depp is the reason to see this movie — his performance is perhaps the best we have seen of him for a while. This is not a feel-good movie. It is very grim and is primarily worth seeing for the performances of the cast. But prepare yourself for the confronting violence if you choose to see it.


Thursday, 8 October 2015

YOUR GUIDE TO THIS WEEK'S NEW CINEMA RELEASES

Just three new cinema releases this week…

TOP PICK TO SEE


BLACK MASS is the true story of Whitey Bulger, the brother of a state senator and the most infamous violent criminal in the history of South Boston, who became an FBI informant to take down a Mafia family invading his turf. If you like gangster movies, then this one will be for you. Johnny Depp stars as Bulger and is excellent in the role.  The Hollywood Reporter’s Todd McCarthy highlights Depp's instinct for observing, underlaying and keeping things in, then letting it all out when required, [which] pays big dividends here in a performance far more convincing than his previous big gangster role, John Dillinger in Michael Mann's Public Enemies; it's unexpected, very welcome at this point in his career, and one of his best. I’ll be posting my review shortly.

MAYBE/MAYBE NOT


Two movies in the maybe/maybe not category this week. First is LEARNING TO DRIVE. As her marriage dissolves, a Manhattan writer takes driving lessons from a Sikh instructor with marriage troubles of his own. In each other's company they find the courage to get back on the road and the strength to take the wheel. It’s a comedy drama romance which The A.V. Club’s Tasha Robinson describes as …harmless sweetness, [with] many revealing speeches about life, and a Kingsley performance that shades strongly into a “Robin Williams as a straight-faced foreigner” routine.

Finally, Drew Barrymore and Toni Collette team up for MISS YOU ALREADY about the friendship between two life-long girlfriends. Their friendship is put to the test when one starts a family and the other falls ill. The critics don’t like this one but general viewers are averaging around three stars. The Playlist says that, Worse than offering no especially fresh angles on its cliched material, [there] are the trite characterizations of the two lead female characters.

That's it for this week. See you at the movies!

*NOTE* Movie summaries are adaptations of movie summary on IMDB. Opinions are mine unless credited. These updates are written from an Australian perspective so openings of the movies in cinemas may vary in other parts of the world.

Monday, 5 October 2015

3D THE MARTIAN

During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and finds himself stranded and alone on the hostile planet. With only meager supplies, he must draw upon his ingenuity, wit and spirit to subsist and find a way to signal to Earth that he is alive. —IMDB

THE MARTIAN is based on the bestselling book of the same name written by Andy Weir. The book was brilliant! While the movie follows the book faithfully, the movie doesn’t quite live up to the book in my view. I found the book more suspenseful than the movie. But the movie is still a very worthwhile outing! The characters are great with all of the cast giving excellent performances. Matt Damon, in the lead role as Mark Watney, stranded on Mars, brings his usual professionalism to the role and conveys the necessary humour in a what is a terrifying situation. However, THE MARTIAN needed to be more gritty and raw  for me - the whole thing seemed too nice and clean. The incredible stress, exhaustion and fear of being stranded alone on a planet conveyed in the book is not matched by the movie. The soundtrack is great, based on the favourite music of one of the mission astronauts left behind on Mars. There’s a bit of a lag in the middle. One of the most interesting aspects of the movie is the focus on the use of science in solving the problems of survival in favour of sensationalism or over-the-top patriotism. The cinematography is very good and worth seeing in 3D. It’s a good piece of entertainment - but check out the book after seeing the movie.


THE INTERN

70-year-old widower Ben Whittaker has discovered that retirement isn't all it's cracked up to be. Seizing an opportunity to get back in the game, he becomes a senior intern at an online fashion site, founded and run by Jules Ostin. —IMDB

This is a charming movie with some tender moments and some witty humour at times. The story affirms and celebrates values of decency and good manners along with the contribution that older people can make to society. Anne Hathaway has real screen presence as the young CEO who has to overcome her prejudices of having an older intern. It’s also good that Robert de Niro is back on screen in a decent role. While the direction loses its focus occasionally, this is an enjoyable, easy-to-watch comedy with some gentle critique of aspects of modern society and good chemistry between its lead actors.


Sunday, 4 October 2015

MACBETH (2015)

Macbeth, a Thane of Scotland, receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland. Consumed by ambition and spurred to action by his wife, Macbeth murders his king and takes the throne for himself. —IMDB

The cinematography and costumes are the best part of this movie. Marion Cotillard as Macbeth’s queen is quite weak. Michael Fassbender, as Macbeth, is good and holds the movie together. While the movie has been updated as far as technical aspects goes, the Shakespearean language would be inaccessible to most modern viewers, in my view. I think this movie will be of most interest to seasoned Shakespeare lovers.